Why to refuse the census

This article was originally published in the Red Pepper online blog, March 20th, 2011. In March this year, as in 2001, Lockheed Martin UK, a subsidiary of the world’s largest arms manufacturer, will be helping to run the census. Their specific role, contractually valued at £150 million, will be “delivering data capture and processing support … Continue reading

The public face of international gun-running

In March this year, as in 2001, Lockheed Martin UK, a subsidiary of the world’s largest arms manufacturer, will be helping to run the census. Their specific role, contractually valued at £150 million, will be “delivering data capture and processing capability” for the Office of National Statistics (ONS). This seems innocent enough, but whilst the … Continue reading

‘Count Me Out’ campaign launched

Last Friday, in the half-light of the early morning, a number of bleary-eyed activists converged from across London upon the Office of National Statistics (ONS) building, near Kings Cross. The occasion was the launch of ‘Count Me Out’, a campaign aiming to raise awareness about the arms trade’s involvement in running the UK census, and … Continue reading

Being the Difference Needs Resistance

One question I always get asked at election time is ‘what’s the position of the radical left?’ Do we vote? If so, for whom? We also tend to get asked if it’s us who are defacing the Tory posters around Leamington. It actually isn’t, to put the record straight; ‘normal’ people hate the Tories too. I … Continue reading

Confessions of a Domestic Extremist

The ink was barely dry on my Boar comment piece two weeks ago when the story of Britain’s ‘domestic extremists’ broke in the press. My article had principally been about protest and the discourse of protest. The thrust of the argument was basically that language and images are manipulated by both policy makers and the … Continue reading

Discursive Ambiguity: A Critical Evaluation of the Discourse Surrounding the Arms Trade

Introduction The discourse surrounding the arms trade is an area that remains under-theorised. Perhaps this is because it relates more to concepts of legitimacy than to the study of security –which naturally tends to focus on more the arms industry’s security implications. Equally, despite its attempts to appear and be treated like any other commercial … Continue reading